Tech Term




MVC (Model–view–controller) frameworks

MVC (Model–view–controller) frameworks

Tech Terms
MVC (Model–view–controller) frameworks https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model%E2%80%93view%E2%80%93controller ===== Model–view–controller (MVC) is a software design pattern for implementing user interfaces on computers. It divides...
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MVM frameworks

MVM frameworks

Tech Terms
MVM frameworks  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model%E2%80%93view%E2%80%93viewmodel === From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Model View ViewModel) Model–view–view-model (MVVM) is...
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Business Process Management (BPM)

Business Process Management (BPM)

Tech Terms
Business Process Management (BPM) http://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/business-process-management ==== Business process management (BPM) is a systematic approach to...
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Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)

Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)

Tech Terms
Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) https://www-01.ibm.com/software/solutions/soa/ === Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) has several core ideas that should...
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MVC (Model–view–controller) frameworks
Tech Terms

MVC (Model–view–controller) frameworks

MVC (Model–view–controller) frameworks

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model%E2%80%93view%E2%80%93controller

=====

Model–view–controller (MVC) is a software design pattern for implementing user interfaces on computers. It divides a given software application into three interconnected parts, so as to separate internal representations of information from the ways that information is presented to or accepted from the user.[1][2]

Traditionally used for desktop graphical user interfaces (GUIs), this architecture has become popular for designing web applications and even mobile, desktop and other clients.[3]

Description[edit]

As with other software architectures, MVC expresses the “core of the solution” to a problem while allowing it to be adapted for each system.[4] Particular MVC architectures can vary significantly from the traditional description here.[5]

Components[edit]

  • The model is the central component of the pattern. It expresses the application’s behavior in terms of the problem domain, independent of the user interface.[6] It directly manages the data, logic and rules of the application.
  • view can be any output representation of information, such as a chart or a diagram. Multiple views of the same information are possible, such as a bar chart for management and a tabular view for accountants.
  • The third part, the controller, accepts input and converts it to commands for the model or view.[7]

Interactions[edit]

In addition to dividing the application into three kinds of components, the model–view–controller design defines the interactions between them.[8]

  • model stores data that is retrieved according to commands from the controller and displayed in the view.
  • view generates new output to the user based on changes in the model.
  • controller can send commands to the model to update the model’s state (e.g., editing a document). It can also send commands to its associated view to change the view’s presentation of the model (e.g., scrolling through a document).
MVM frameworks
Tech Terms

MVM frameworks

MVM frameworks 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model%E2%80%93view%E2%80%93viewmodel

===

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Model View ViewModel)

MVVMPattern.png

Model–view–view-model (MVVM) is a software architectural pattern.

MVVM facilitates a separation of development of the graphical user interface – be it via a markup language or GUI code – from development of the business logic or back-end logic (the data model). The view model of MVVM is a value converter;[1] meaning the view model is responsible for exposing (converting) the data objects from the model in such a way that objects are easily managed and presented. In this respect, the view model is more model than view, and handles most if not all of the view’s display logic.[1] The view model may implement a mediator pattern, organizing access to the back-end logic around the set of use cases supported by the view.

MVVM is a variation of Martin Fowler‘s Presentation Model design pattern.[2][3] MVVM abstracts a view’s state and behavior in the same way,[3] but a Presentation Model abstracts a view (creates a view model) in a manner not dependent on a specific user-interface platform.
MVVM and Presentation Model both derive from the model–view–controller pattern (MVC).

MVVM was developed by Microsoft architects Ken Cooper and Ted Peters specifically to simplify event-driven programming of user interfaces—by exploiting features of Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF)(Microsoft’s .NET graphics system) and Silverlight (WPF’s Internet application derivative).[3] John Gossman, one of Microsoft’s WPF and Silverlight architects, announced MVVM on his blog in 2005.

Model–view–viewmodel is also referred to as model–view–binder, especially in implementations not involving the .NET platform. ZK (a web application framework written in Java) and KnockoutJS (a JavaScriptlibrary) use model–view–binder.[3][4][5]

Business Process Management (BPM)
Tech Terms

Business Process Management (BPM)

Business Process Management (BPM)

http://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/business-process-management

====

Business process management (BPM) is a systematic approach to making an organization’s workflow more effective, more efficient and more capable of adapting to an ever-changing environment. A business process is an activity or set of activities that will accomplish a specific organizational goal.

The goal of BPM is to reduce human error and miscommunication and focus stakeholders on the requirements of their roles. BPM is a subset of infrastructure management, an administrative area concerned with maintaining and optimizing an organization’s equipment and core operations.

BPM is often a point of connection within a company between the line-of-business (LOB) and the IT department. Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) and Business Process Management Notation (BPMN) were both created to facilitate communication between IT and the LOB. Both languages are easy to read and learn, so that business people can quickly learn to use them and design processes. Both BPEL and BPMN adhere to the basic rules of programming, so that processes designed in either language are easy for developers to translate into hard code.

There are three different kinds of BPM frameworks available in the market today. Horizontal frameworks deal with design and development of business processes and are generally focused on technology and reuse. Vertical BPM frameworks focus on a specific set of coordinated tasks and have pre-built templates that can be readily configured and deployed. Full-service BPM suites have five basic components:

While on-premise business process management (BPM) has been the norm for most enterprises, advances in cloud computing have lead to increased interest in on-demand, software as a service (SaaS) offerings.

See also: business process outsourcing (BPO), Web Services Description Language (WSDL), enterprise application integration (EAI), business process reengineering (BPR), business activity monitoring (BAM)

Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)
Tech Terms

Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)

Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)

https://www-01.ibm.com/software/solutions/soa/

===

Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) has several core ideas that should be addressed in your organization’s SOA journey:

 

  • A set of services that a business wants to provide to their customers, partners, or other areas of an organization
  • An architectural style that requires a service provider, mediation, and service requestor with a service description
  • A set of architectural principles, patterns and criteria that address characteristics such as modularity, encapsulation, loose coupling, separation of concerns, reuse and composability
  • A programming model complete with standards, tools and technologies that supports web services, REST services or other kinds of services
  • A middleware solution optimized for service assembly, orchestration, monitoring, and management

 

With the convergence of mobile, social, cloud, and big data analytics, SOA is more important than ever before for offering insight and integrating systems from end to end. By applying Service Oriented Architecture principles, an enterprise can manage and govern business and IT transformation, setting them apart from their competitors. The benefits range from seamless integration, cloud enabled solutions, holistic business insight and agility to externalized APIs. SOA integrates the front office, back office and the Internet of Things.

Middleware, best practices and patterns speed the Service Oriented Architecture journey and amplify the value it creates. IBM has over a decade of experience with SOA and a broad portfolio of capabilities, spanning integration, processes, operational control and services. SOA is “simply good design” — resting on a solid foundation of technology and practices that support your organization’s journey into the changing world of mobile, social, cloud and big data.